Be Not Afraid. An historical artifact that wasn’t what it seemed was the Ark of the Covenant. Around the time Moses received the 10 Commandments on Mt Sinai, probably in the Sinai Peninsula in the Middle East, he received instructions for building an Ark in which to put the tablets. The instructions are in Exodus 25:10: “The Ark must be 21/2 cubits long, 11/2 cubits wide and high. It must be gold plated inside and outside. A gold molding must be around the top. It is gold-plated acacia wood. Put 2 gold rings on each side and make 2 gold plated poles to go through the rings to carry the Ark. The poles must never be removed from the Ark. Make a cover of pure gold 21/2 cubits long and 11/2 cubits wide. Make 2 cherubim of beaten gold for the two ends of the cover and of one piece with the cover. The cherubim will have their wings spread out above the cover, sheltering the cover with them. They shall face each other and look down at the cover. Put the Covenant inside with the cover on the Ark. There I will meet you, and there, from above the cover, between the two cherubim on the Ark, I will tell you all that I command regarding the Israelites.” People have speculated about the real purpose of the Ark because it killed Aaron’s 2 sons and a man who touched it to keep his balance during a journey. Redfern said it played a role in parting the Red Sea, but the Ark hadn’t been built before they fled Egypt. It may have played a role in the fall of Jericho, however. We are led to believe that a creative use of sound felled the walls of Jericho. Redfern believes that the ancients had a lost technology of acoustics. Some people think acoustic levitation was used to move the blocks of the pyramids, and other huge ancient structures. Acoustic levitation means to introduce two opposing sound frequencies with interfering sound waves, creating a resonant zone that allows levitation to occur (Jones and Flaxman, “The Resonance Key”). The only way acoustics would work with the Ark is if it was weaponized. Redfern quotes Ark investigator Paul Schroeder: “There is overwhelming biblical evidence that the Ark of the Covenant was structurally designed to act as both an alien transmitter-capacitor/weapon. The Ark, lethal if touched, was used to communicate with aliens posing as God and it aided Israelites when it was carried into battles. This machine/weapon technological artifice was an alien designed three-in-one communication device set, religious receptacle, and weapon of mass destruction.” I have read the part of the OT where the Israelites have reached Canaan and are wiping out towns and cities, and are leaving nothing alive. In some of those cities there were Anunnaki who never left Earth, and they were larger than humans and had advanced weapons. The fact that the Israelites left no person or animal alive argues for a weapon of mass destruction. In the OT it is very final, very nihilistic, especially since God ordained the slaughter. Other people have other ideas for why the Ark was so dangerous. Roger Isaacs, in his book “Talking with God,” says that the Ark was radioactive. The priests of the Ark used incense and it wasn’t to propitiate a god. He says they used incense for a very practical purpose. He says the oily smokiness protected them from radiation burns. He says: “The Israelite priests were trained to manufacture and use the Lord’s specified mixture…” Other people think the Ark was dangerous because it produced electricity. The ancients may have made Leyden jars. It’s a glass jar that’s lined with metal foil inside and outside and electrodes inside and outside. This can produce static electricity. We know that the ancients had batteries; they’ve been found in Baghdad. Nicola Tesla suggested that electricity was generated by friction of air against silk curtains and stored in a box constructed like a condenser. Thus Aaron’s sons could have been killed by a high tension discharge (quoted in Redfern). We don’t really know the purpose of the Ark of the Covenant, but we suspect it wasn’t just to contain some laws on a tablet.

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